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Child Protection Plans


Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. Formulation of the Child Protection Plan
  3. The Social Worker Role
  4. The Core Group
  5. Risk Assessment
  6. Difficulties in Implementing the Child Protection Plan

    Amendments to this Chapter


1. Introduction

Each child/young person whose name is placed on the Child Protection Register must have a Child Protection Plan. The purpose of the plan is to facilitate and make explicit a co-ordinated approach to the protection from further harm of each child/young person on the Child Protection Register.

When a conference decides that a child/young person should be the subject of a Child Protection Plan, a social worker must be allocated as the social worker to co-ordinate all aspects of the inter-agency Child Protection Plan.

The Child Protection Plan must make clear to the child/young person, family, and all relevant professionals the exact nature of the concerns which resulted in the child/young person requiring the plan.

The Child Protection Plan should set out what work needs to be done, why, when and by whom. If there are obstacles to progressing the Child Protection Plan that cannot be satisfactorily addressed, an early Child Protection Review Conference must be convened.

The plan will be outlined at the conference and the social worker and Core Group are responsible for ensuring that it is drawn up in detail and acted upon. The reasons why the child/young person was considered to have suffered and/or likely to suffer significant harm and the Child Protection Plan as currently agreed will constitute an agenda item at each review conference.

The Child Protection Plan can be used as evidence in any legal proceedings of the services that have been put in place to work in partnership with the child/young person and family to reduce the level of risk.

The Core Group is the forum to co-ordinate this multi-agency, collaborative work and the membership will have been identified at the initial Child Protection Conference.


2. Formulation of the Child Protection Plan

Purpose of Child Protection Plan

The purpose of a Child Protection Plan is to facilitate and make explicit a co-ordinated approach to:

  • Ensure that each child/young person in the household is safe and prevent them from suffering further harm;
  • Promote the child/young person's welfare, identifying their specific needs, health and development;
  • Provided it is in the best interests of the child/young person, to support the family and wider family members to safeguard and promote the welfare of their child/young person.

It must be clarified for parents:

  • What the causes for concern are that have resulted in the decision that a child/young person needs a child/young person protection plan;
  • What needs to change and contingency plans if not;
  • What the intended outcomes of the intervention and services are;
  • What is expected of them as part of the plan for safeguarding the child/young person;
  • All parties must be clear about the respective roles and responsibilities of family members and different agencies in implementing the plan.

Review of progress on achieving the outcomes set out in the child/young person protection plan and consideration as to whether changes need to be made should be an agenda item at each review conference and Core Group meeting. Contingency plans should be made, if there is no evidence of change in relation to the child/young person’s safety and welfare.

Detailed Child Protection Plan - Written Agreement

Outline Children Protection Plan

An outline plan must be drawn up at initial and review conferences, following the decision to register or continue registration. The outline plan should include an indication of what the conference believes needs to change before de-registration can be considered. The aim of the outline plan is to assist the Core Group to form a clearer focus of work with the family and to explicitly define individual professional responsibilities. It will detail the recommendations made at the conference and include:

  • A summary of the abuse or the neglect suffered or likely to be suffered which led to the decision to place the child/young person’s name on the Register;
  • Broad objectives for the child/young person’s welfare, identifying his / her specific needs;
  • Information gathered from the Assessment, the identification of risk factors and actions required to protect the child/young person from significant harm;
  • Types of services or support required by the child/young person and other family members to support the family in promoting the child/young person’s welfare;
  • Short-term and longer-term aims and objectives that are clearly linked to reducing the likelihood of harm to the child/young person and promoting the child/young person’s welfare, including contact with family members;
  • Time scales for the completion of an Assessment;
  • Identification of any specialist assessments of the child/young person and family that may be required to ensure sound judgements can be made on how best to safeguard the child/young person and promote his / her welfare;
  • Responsibility for immediate tasks must be ascribed to specific members of the conference, including family members;
  • Expectations of what the parents need to do to ensure compliance with the plan, written in clear language and taking into account cultural differences and communication needs;
  • Methods of monitoring and evaluating progress against the planned outcomes set out in the plan, including identifying which professional is responsible for monitoring and recording the required changes and communicating this to the social worker;
  • Consideration of a contingency plan and the circumstances that would necessitate its use.

The Child Protection Plan

The Core Group is responsible for drawing up in more detail the child/young person protection plan for each child/young person covering the following areas:

  • Identification of risks to the child/young person and the means of protection;
  • A summary of the abuse, neglect and other forms of maltreatment the child/young person or other members of the family have suffered or are likely to suffer if the actions in the plan are not followed;
  • A description of the identified needs of the child/young person and other family members and what services are required to address each need or prevent further impairment;
  • Ethnic / cultural / religious considerations e.g. necessity for an interpreter, avoidance of appointments with family on significant religious festivals;
  • Needs arising from any disability, of the child/young person or the parents;
  • A consideration of the views of the child/young person, spelling out if these cannot be followed because they are not consistent with the child/young person’s welfare;
  • Identification of parenting strengths and difficulties, and the support needed to overcome deficits and difficulties;
  • A clear identification of roles and responsibilities of professionals and family members;
  • Identification of what needs to change to reduce the risk of significant harm, which is specific about the different aspects of harm and impairment, and actions to promote the child/young person’s health and development;
  • A description of the nature and frequency of the multi-agency support to the child/young person to be provided by which professionals, as well as the roles and responsibilities of professionals with each family member, including specialist resources.

The plan should be based on the ongoing assessment of the child/young person and family and follow the dimensions of the assessment framework. The social worker should formulate the detailed child/young person protection plan in the form of a written agreement for all the parties to sign. It should be constructed with the family in their preferred language, taking into account cultural and communication needs.

Copies of the notes and the written agreement should be circulated to Core Group members and conference chair within 5 working days of the Core Group meeting. The signed agreement should be returned to the social worker within another 5 working days.

Any dissent about the plan, by family or professionals, must be recorded, with reasons.

The family must be told about their right to make a complaint either to the agency of the specific professional or to the SPB about the conduct of the child/young person protection conference or other aspects of inter-agency practice, and the procedure for doing so.

See:

All agencies are responsible for the implementation of the child/young person protection plan and all professionals must ensure they are able to deliver their commitments, or if not possible, that these are renegotiated.

The allocated social worker must ensure that there is a record of the Core Group meetings and must ensure that they formulate the detailed Child Protection Plan setting out timescales and expected outcomes for the child/young person.

The Child Protection Plan / agreement should take into consideration the wishes and feelings of the child/young person, and the views of the parents, insofar as they are consistent with the child/young person's welfare. The allocated social worker should make every effort to ensure that the child/young person and parents have a clear understanding of the planned outcomes, that they accept the plan and are willing to work to it.

The completed Child Protection Plan / agreement should be explained to the child/young person in a manner which is in accordance with their age and understanding. The child/young person should be given a copy of the plan written at a level appropriate to their age and understanding, and in their preferred language.

Professionals should ensure that the parents understand:

  • The evidence of the child/young person suffering significant harm, or likely significant harm, which resulted in the child/young person becoming the subject of a Child Protection Plan;
  • What needs to change;
  • What is expected of them in the plan to safeguard the child/young person.

If the parents' preferences have not been accepted in the plan / agreement about how best to safeguard and promote the welfare of the child/young person, the reasons for this should be explained. Parents should be told about their right to complain and make representations, and how to do so.

All parties should be clear about the respective roles and responsibilities of family members and different agencies in implementing the child/young person protection plan / agreement.

Implementation of the child/young person protection plan must begin immediately.

Any disagreements should have been discussed at the Core Group meeting, recorded with reasons and reflected appropriately in the written plan / agreement. It is permissible to rely on electronic signatures or emails confirming acceptance of an agency's responsibilities under the child/young person protection plan, but all such signatures and emails must be collected in the child/young person's social care record.

All agencies are responsible for the implementation of the child/young person protection plan and all professionals must ensure they are able to deliver their commitments or, if not possible, that these are re-negotiated.


3. The Social Worker Role

It is important that the role of the allocated social worker is fully explained at the Initial Child Protection Conference and at the Core Group.

At every Initial or Pre-Birth Conference, where a Child Protection Plan is put into place, the conference chair must name a social worker, identified by the Children’s Social Care Manager, to fulfil the role of social worker for the child/young person.

The social worker should complete the assessment of the child/young person and family, securing contributions from Core Group members and others as necessary. They should co-ordinate the contribution of family members and other agencies to plan the actions that need to be taken, put the Child Protection Plan into effect, and review progress against the planned outcomes set out in the plan.

The social worker should also regularly ascertain the child/young person's wishes and feelings, and keep the child/young person up to date with the Child Protection Plan and any developments or changes.

The social worker should:

  • See the child/young person (infants and babies to be seen awake) as agreed in the Child Protection Plan. The frequency of visiting must be determined in the Child Protection Plan and reviewed by the Core Group;
  • See the child/young person on their own each visit where appropriate occasions;
  • Explain the plan to the child/young person in a manner which is in accordance with their age and understanding;
  • See the child/young person’s bedroom and other area's of the home as agreed in the plan but not less than alternate occasions;
  • Undertake direct work with the child/young person and family in accordance with the Child Protection Plan, taking into account the child/young person's wishes and feelings and the views of the parents in so far as they are consistent with the child/young person's welfare;
  • Convene and lead second and subsequent Core Group meetings (the first Core Group meeting having been led by their manager) and professionals or legal advice meetings. Complex cases will continue to be led by a manager;
  • Provide a written record of meetings for all Core Group members and the Children's Social Care Manager noting in the written record any areas of disagreement;
  • Ensure that the outline Child Protection Plan is developed, in conjunction with members of the Core Group, into a detailed multi-agency protection plan;
  • Clearly note and include in the written record any areas of disagreement;
  • Produce a written agreement from the Protection Plan to be maintained on the child/young person's file and circulated to the Core Group members to be signed;
  • Obtain a full understanding of the family's history, which must involve reading previous social care files as well as current records in use by the Children’s Service including those relating to other child/young person who have been part of any households involving the current carers of the child/young person. Additional information should be obtained from relevant other agencies and authorities to create a multi-agency Chronology which includes a Genogram;
  • Complete the Assessment of the child/young person and family, securing contributions / information from Core Group members and any other agencies with relevant information;
  • Co-ordinate the contribution of family members and all agencies in putting the plan into action and regularly reviewing the objectives stated in the plan;
  • The social worker must maintain a complete and up-to-date signed record on the child/young person's current file, electronic or manual.

The social worker must see the child/young person or young person at home at least every 4 weeks. The frequency of contact by the social worker is the general minimum standard. If a social worker has difficulty obtaining direct access to the child/young person, the Children’s Service Team Manager should be informed, as well as other Core Group members. In these circumstances, a strategy meeting may be called with legal advice as necessary and the Child Protection Conference Chair should be informed


4. The Core Group

Responsibilities

The Core Group is responsible for the detailed formulation and implementation of the Child Protection Plan, previously outlined at the conference. Agencies should ensure that members of the Core Group undertake their roles and responsibilities effectively in accordance with the agreed Child Protection Plan.

All members of the Core Group are jointly responsible for:

  • Collecting and sharing information to assist the social worker in completing the assessment;
  • Participating in the compilation and analysis of the assessment;
  • The formulation and implementation of the detailed Child Protection Plan, specifying who should do what, by when;
  • Carrying out their part in implementing the plan including the commitment of identified resources;
  • Monitoring and evaluating progress against specified outcomes for the child/young person of the detailed Child Protection Plan;
  • Making recommendations to subsequent review conferences about future protection plans and the child/young person’s needs being met stipulating specific outcomes;
  • Attending Core Group meetings and reviewing progress to ensure that there is no drift in achieving the aims of the Child Protection Plan;
  • The Core Group must ensure that the Child Protection Plan sets out the frequency for all Core Group members to see the child/young person and the frequency of all contacts;
  • All action points must be clearly recorded, analysis of the risk of harm to the child/young person should be made and all the information should be shared with the social worker and the Core Group. All Core Group members are responsible for keeping a record of the outcome of the meeting.

If the social worker or any other involved professional has difficulty obtaining direct access to the child/young person, the Children’s Social Care Manager / Child Protection Adviser must be informed, as well as other Core Group members. This must result in a plan of action agreed between Core Group members and the Police including consideration of convening a review conference.

Core groups are an important forum for working with parents, wider family members, and child/young person of sufficient age and understanding. It can often be difficult for parents to agree to a Child Protection Plan within the confines of a formal conference. Their agreement may be gained later when details of the plan are worked out in the Core Group. Sometimes there may be conflicts of interest between family members who have a relevant interest in the work of the Core Group. The child/young person’s best interests should always take precedence over the interests of other family members.

The first meeting of the Core Group must take place within 10 working days of the initial child/young person protection conference. The purpose of this first meeting is to flesh out the child/young person protection plan and decide what steps need to be taken by whom to complete the Assessment on time. Thereafter, Core Groups must meet regularly, at least 4 weekly, to facilitate working together, monitor actions and outcomes against the Child Protection Plan, and make any necessary alterations as circumstances change.

The Core Group has a collective responsibility to produce reports for the Child Protection Review. Together, these reports provide an overview of work undertaken by family members and professionals, and evaluate the impact on the child/young person’s welfare against the planned outcomes set out in the Child Protection Plan. The roles and duties of the Core Groups include:

  • Review of the membership of the Core Group, to determine if there are other professionals or family members who should be included;
  • Clarification of the role and contribution of each member of the Core Group explicitly and assignation of specific tasks with agreed outcomes and timeframes for each member of the Core Group;
  • Ensuring that written notes of decisions are taken and actions agreed at Core Group meetings;
  • Formulation of the detailed Child Protection Plan in the form of a written agreement for all the parties to sign and regularly reviewing and, where necessary, modifying it;
  • Agreeing the frequency, venue and purpose of Core Group meetings.

Membership

Membership of the Core Group will have been identified at the Initial Child Protection Conference and must include:

  • The social worker / and their manager. Which one of these professionals chairs / leads the Core Group is dependent on the complexity of the case;
  • The child/young person if appropriate;
  • Parents and relevant family members;
  • Professionals, including residential staff and foster carers involved with the child/young person and / or parent.

Timing

The date of the first Core Group meeting must be within ten working days of the Initial Child Protection Conference. After that the Core Group must meet at least every four weeks following the first review conference. More regular meetings may be required according to the needs and age of the child/young person.

The first Core Group meeting date must be arranged at the end of the conference, along with the required frequency of subsequent meetings.

Dates for future meetings must be agreed at the first Core Group meeting following each conference. Where a meeting needs to be rescheduled, this must be confirmed in writing to all concerned by the social worker.


5. Risk Assessment

The social worker and line manager must, in supervision, regularly consider the risks to the child/young person and whether a systematic risk assessment should be undertaken. A risk assessment must be completed in the following circumstances:

  • Prior to de-registration;
  • When a case has been on the Child Protection Register for a year;
  • When consideration is being given to the initiation of care proceedings;
  • In particularly complex cases.


6. Difficulties in Implementing the Child Protection Plan

Where any member of the Core Group is aware of difficulties implementing the protection plan, the social worker must be informed immediately and a Core Group meeting / discussion co-ordinated to agree a reconsidered child/young person protection plan. Alternatively a Strategy Discussion/Meeting should be convened to consider the need for immediate emergency Police action to gain access to a premises where appropriate, an Article 42 Enquiry, legal action, and/or to bring forward the date of the review child/young person protection conference. Arranging a legal planning meeting should be considered by the social worker with their line manager.

Circumstances about which the social worker should be informed include inability to gain access to a child/young person who is subject to a Child Protection Plan, for whatever reasons.

Failure to see a Child/Young Person who has been Registered

Where a professional is prevented from seeing a child/young person on the Child Protection Register this should be considered a cause for concern and the social worker should also be notified immediately. If the social worker is not available, then their line manager, another Child/ren’s Service line manager or the duty social worker should be promptly notified.

Attempts to prevent professionals from seeing a child/young person may occur in a variety of ways such as deliberate refusal of entry, excuses regarding the child/young person’s alleged unavailability through sleep, out playing etc or the family’s real or apparent absence from the home. Research has shown that where a child/young person has died often this is preceded by professionals being prevented from seeing the child/young person on a regular and continuous basis. Where a social worker is notified of a difficulty in seeing a child/young person they should notify their line manager. Any agency, which has a similar problem, should likewise inform their Line Manager.

A decision should be made regarding the urgency for a visit to take place by the social worker or, in their absence, the duty social worker. If a further visit is made and the child/young person is still not seen, possible further action must be considered and discussed with the line manager. Delay should not occur as a result of a line manager not being available. The responsibility remains with the social worker, or duty social worker, to seek advice from a manager. Should a visit prove unsuccessful, a decision must be made whether or not to enlist the assistance of the Police or consider a Strategy Meeting with legal advice.

Children and Young People on the Child Protection Register who are Missing

All professionals and agencies should bear in mind, when working with children/young people and families where there are outstanding child protection concerns, that a series of missed appointments or home visits that fail may indicate that a family have suddenly and unexpectedly moved out of the area. The reason could be quite innocent but at the same time professionals must be aware of some of the factors that cause such a sudden move such as domestic violence, witness intimidation, avoidance of the professionals and agencies dealing with the case.

Particular consideration needs to be given to appropriate legal interventions where it appears that a child/young person for whom there are outstanding child protection concerns may be removed from Jersey by his / her family in order to evade the involvement of agencies charged with safeguarding responsibilities. A Strategy Meeting and/or urgent Review Meeting must be convened. All professionals must immediately notify their manager should it come to their attention that a child/young person whose name is on the Register is missing. In the case of:

  • Children’s Service - Team Manager;
  • Police Protection Unit – Sergeant;
  • Health - Designated Nurse;
  • Education - Head Teacher.

In all cases where a child/young person on the Register is found to be, or considered, a missing child/young person, apart from informing their manager, any professional or agency should ensure the Children’s Service duty social worker is informed as soon as possible.

The social worker for the child/young person will make extensive enquiries in an attempt to locate the child/young person. Such enquiries will include the following:

  • Contact with the Legal Services if the child/young person is subject to a Court Order;
  • Contact with all agencies that have been involved with the child/young person including those agencies involved in first registration, and any known relatives;
  • Making enquiries within the neighbourhood, including schools;
  • Contact with the Housing Provider as appropriate;
  • The Police.

The Education department should be able to advise on the transfer of school age children/young people. Where there is serious concern, the Police should be notified through the Police Protection Unit so that consideration can be given to further enquiries including a possible missing person registration and enquiry. Depending on the nature and / or severity of concern for the child/young person, national tracing procedures should be instigated. This should however be regarded as a last resort when all other efforts to trace the child/young person have failed, unless there are clear indications giving rise for urgent concern. Where a child/young person is still missing after enquiries have been made the social worker will consider with their manager whether to call a Strategy Meeting and request a Child Protection Review meeting before the next, previously set review date.

De-Registration

A child/young person’s name will be removed from the Register when it is judged that the child/young person is no longer at continuing risk of significant harm or in need of a continuing protection plan. Consideration of removal will be taken at each review and any agency involved with the child/young person may request a conference is convened to consider the possibility of de-registration.

Those invited to a review must ensure their views on de-registration are put before the meeting even if they cannot attend in person. Grounds for de-registration include:

  • The judgement that the child/young person is no longer at continuing risk of significant harm, requiring safeguarding by means of a formal multi-agency Child Protection Plan;
  • The child/young person has remained at home and completion of the Assessment, including analysis of risk, has shown that registration and a protection plan is no longer required;
  • The abusing adult is no longer in the household and/or no longer has contact with the child/young person or is not likely to have future contact or there is no longer risk as a result of contact;
  • The child/young person is looked after and contact arrangements are such that there is no likelihood of maltreatment;
  • The child/young person is cared for by relatives and it is judged that he/she is no longer at risk of significant harm from the carers as a result of contact arrangements;
  • Child/young person has reached the age of 18 years, has died or has permanently left Jersey.

A child/young person whose name is removed from the Child Protection Register may still require some form of support. De-registration does not automatically mean that support and services will no longer be provided and discussion will take place with the young person as appropriate / parents in this respect. It may be that single agency or multi-agency support will continue to be needed. If any professional is in disagreement with the forward plan challenge of the forward plan should happen in the meeting. If the professional remains unsatisfied and is concerned that the child may be at risk in any way there must be reference to the Escalation Policy and Resolution Pathway.

Where a child/young person is approaching the age of 18 years and de-registration will then occur, it is considered good practice that consultation takes place with the young person to establish what help they will find useful. The Conference Chair will ensure this happens.

Review Child Protection Conferences

The Independent Safeguarding and Standards service is responsible for convening the review Child Protection Conference. A review conference should be held within three months following a child/young person’s name being placed on the Child Protection Register. Subsequent reviews should be held at intervals of no more than six months for as long as the child/young person remains on the register.

Dates for conferences should usually only be changed in exceptional circumstances and with the agreement of the Manager of Independent Safeguarding and Standards. Consideration should be given to bringing forward the date of a review conference in the following circumstances:

  • When the whereabouts of a child or young person on the Child Protection Register is unknown;
  • Where the child or young person continues to be at risk due to non-adherence to the Child Protection Plan;
  • Where there are fresh concerns of significant harm to a child or young person already on the Register;
  • Where the circumstances of a child or young person currently on the Register significantly changes.

Purpose

The purpose of a Review conference is to:

  • Review the safety, health, development and welfare of the child/young person or young person against intended outcomes set out in the Child Protection Plan;
  • Ensure that the child or young person continues to be adequately safeguarded and that their needs are continuing to be met;
  • Consider whether the Child Protection Plan should continue in place or should be changed;
  • Decide what future action, if any, is needed to safeguard the child or young person and / or promote outcomes and to decide whether the criteria for de-registration have been met.

First Review

The first Review Conference should be the occasion for the production of the full Child Protection Plan based on the Assessment. The Review Conference should bring together all the professionals and family members who have been involved in the Core Group meetings and any other individuals who have significant contribution to make, arising from professional expertise, knowledge of the child/young person or family or both.

The procedure for establishing a quorum and the process for decision making in the Review Conference is the same procedure that is used to decide whether a child/young person’s name should be placed on the Child Protection Register in Initial Conferences. The Core Group set up from the Initial Child Protection Conference has a collective responsibility to produce reports for the first Review Conference including minutes of all Core Group meetings. These reports, together with the core and related assessments, should provide the overview of the work with the family.

Factors to be Decided

The Child Protection Review Conference needs to:

  • Review the current Child Protection Plan and to consider the child or young person’s and the family response to the support provided. Consider the details and outcome of the core and related assessments;
  • Consider how this plan relates to the original risk assessment and whether the outcomes have altered the concerns, level of risk; formulate a new Child Protection Plan in order to ensure the child or young person is safeguarded and their needs are met if the risk to the child/young person or young person continues;
  • Consider whether the risk to the child or young person has diminished sufficiently to enable the review to agree to de-registration because a formal multi-agency Child Protection Plan is no longer necessary. In addition to the child/ren or young people who are the focus of the review, consideration should be given to whether any other child/young person in the household may be at risk of significant harm as a result of further child protection enquiries/assessments;
  • The Review Conference can make the decision to place these child/young person’s names on the Child Protection Register and consider the present category of registration. If this is the case, it must function as an Initial Child Protection Conference with respect to these additional child/ren or young people. When a decision to register is made the Chair will provide guidance on the category or categories under which the child/young person’s name will be registered;
  • If the review conference decides that a formal multi-agency Child Protection Plan is no longer required, the conference should consider whether multi-agency or single agency Child in Need or Team around the child and family plans are needed to assist the family and prevent further impairment and/or development of any child/young person of the family. If any professional is in disagreement with the forward plan challenge of the forward plan should happen in the meeting. If the professional remains unsatisfied and is concerned that the child may be at risk in any way there must be reference to the Escalation and Resolution Pathway.
  • Agree a time and date for the next Core Group meeting and next Review Conference; there must be no more than 6 months between Review Conferences.

Reports to a Review Conference

There may be exceptional circumstances when a review of the Child Protection Plan can be undertaken by an exchange of written reports rather than requiring a face-to-face conference (e.g. when a child/young person is “looked after” off Island). In all other cases, participants are expected to send their reports to the Chair at least three working days before the review conference and attend in person to address their report.

The format and the contents for the social worker’s report for the review conference will contain details as outlined in the section of the Children’s Service handbook at ‘Reports by Children’s Service to Conferences and Reviews’. Professionals who are invited to attend a Conference or Review should submit a report detailing their involvement with the child/young person and family whether they are able to attend the meeting or not. The reports should be in the format agreed by the Safeguarding Children Partnership Board (SPB). There will be variations in the extent to which all sections are filled in dependent upon the agency’s knowledge of the family and the extent and nature of its involvement. It is good practice that a distinction is made between fact, observation, allegation and opinion.

See:

It is important that, at each Review Conference following the Initial Child/young person Protection Conference, the issue of continuing registration or de-registration is discussed. A child/young person’s name will be removed from the Child Protection Register when it is judged that the child/young person is no longer at continuing risk of significant harm requiring safeguarding by means of a formal multi-agency Child Protection Plan. Only a Child Protection Review Conference that is quorate can decide that registration is no longer necessary. It is therefore important that as many of the professionals involved with the family and child/young person attend each review and where attendance cannot be achieved, send their view on de-registration in their report to the Review Conference. Click here for details of De-Registration.

Conflict Resolution

If members are concerned that there are difficulties implementing the protection plan arising from disagreement amongst professional agencies or a Core Group member not carrying out agreed responsibilities this must be addressed by:

  • First, discussion with Core Group members;
  • Second, if required, involvement of respective managers / Child Protection Advisers (e.g. Safeguarding Manager for Children's Social Care, Designated / Named Safeguarding Children Doctor / Nurse, Teacher or Police DCI);
  • If the situation remains unresolved see Escalation Policy and Resolution Pathway.

Amendments to this Chapter

In March 2017, this chapter was updated including the addition of an Agency CPC Report Template and a Social Work CPC Report Template.

End.